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Originally published in Queue vol. 16, no. 5
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Comments

(newest first)

Emma | Tue, 15 Jan 2019 15:20:39 UTC

Very useful tips, thanks for the post. However I'm not sure how to apply these techniques when a database is used by more than one application.


Oli Steadman | Mon, 14 Jan 2019 13:10:53 UTC

Thanks; halfway through, I was wondering whether such a detailed analysis (of the steps required to update SQL schema) was really justified by the title of the article BUT you did a great job of tying it all together, and overall I'm left with a sense of having learned some super-useful tips. Especially this Life Lesson about risk (ie it doesn't just apply to DevOps but to so much more!): "When something is risky there is a natural inclination to seek to do it less. Counterintuitively, this actually *increases* risk: the next time you do the risky thing, you'll be even more out of practice, and the accumulated changes to the surrounding environment become larger and larger... making failure-by-unknown-side-effect nearly guaranteed." ??


msdhoni | Tue, 08 Jan 2019 09:20:55 UTC

Great content useful for all the candidates of DevOps training who want to kick start these career in DevOps training field.


Michael Mullany | Mon, 07 Jan 2019 22:47:47 UTC

Anyone trying to do DevOps with SQL should be looking at using Datrium storage, which uses a log structured file system to eliminate restore latency (every write batch in Datrium is its own snapshot - which can be promoted to live pretty much instantly). (full disclosure - I'm an investor in them.)


Simson Garfinkel | Sun, 30 Dec 2018 14:31:01 UTC

Great article about how to integrate DevOps principles into organizations that rely on SQL. Two techniques that I've found useful are having multiple SQL databases filled with the same data so that you can run the same code on pre- and post-schema changes, and using Views so that legacy code can continue to run with the old schema. I have also recently seen an SQL proxy that is used to implement additional functionality (in this case, access control for privacy protection and compliance).

Have you written anything else on integrating DevOps techniques into organizations that are resistant to change?


Jason | Tue, 18 Dec 2018 16:17:52 UTC

Flyway (https://flywaydb.org/) is there for the Java crowd.


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