FPGAs

Vol. 18 No. 3 – May-June 2020

FPGAs

Sanity vs. Invisible Markings

Tabs vs. spaces

Invisible and near-invisible markings bring us to the human part of the problem?not that code editor authors aren't human, but most of us will not write new editors, though all of us will use editors. As we all know, once upon a time computers had small memories and the difference between a tab, which is a single byte, and a corresponding number of spaces (8) could be a significant difference between the size of source code stored on a precious disk, and also transferred, over whatever primitive and slow bus, from storage into memory.

by George Neville-Neil

Data on the Outside vs. Data on the Inside

Data kept outside SQL has different characteristics from data kept inside.

This article describes the impact of services and trust on the treatment of data. It introduces the notions of inside data as distinct from outside data. After discussing the temporal implications of not sharing transactions across the boundaries of services, the article considers the need for immutability and stability in outside data. This leads to a depiction of outside data as a DAG of data items being independently generated by disparate services.

by Pat Helland

The History, Status, and Future of FPGAs

Hitting a nerve with field-programmable gate arrays

This article is a summary of a three-hour discussion at Stanford University in September 2019 among the authors. It has been written with combined experiences at and with organizations such as Zilog, Altera, Xilinx, Achronix, Intel, IBM, Stanford, MIT, Berkeley, University of Wisconsin, the Technion, Fairchild, Bell Labs, Bigstream, Google, DIGITAL (DEC), SUN, Nokia, SRI, Hitachi, Silicom, Maxeler Technologies, VMware, Xerox PARC, Cisco, and many others. These organizations are not responsible for the content, but may have inspired the authors in some ways, to arrive at the colorful ride through FPGA space described above.

by Oskar Mencer, Dennis Allison, Elad Blatt, Mark Cummings, Michael J. Flynn, Jerry Harris, Carl Hewitt, Quinn Jacobson, Maysam Lavasani, Mohsen Moazami, Hal Murray, Masoud Nikravesh, Andreas Nowatzyk, Mark Shand, Shahram Shirazi