Release the Kraken: A Story of Node.js in the Enterprise (PayPal)

Node Summit

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A case study in how PayPal revitalized its tech stack by moving from Java, JSP and proprietary solutions to a Node.js web application stack with dust.js templating. Developer agility was our primary motivation, but along the way we had to tackle enterprise culture and teach people that JavaScript is no longer a 'toy', but a powerful tool to wield. https://vimeo.com/nodesummit/review/85785820/40c2a4811a

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Given that humanity’s study of the sociological factors in safety is almost a century old, the technology industry’s post-incident analysis practices and how we create and use the artifacts those practices produce are all still in their infancy. So don’t be surprised that many of these practices are so similar, that the cognitive and social models used to parse apart and understand incidents and outages are few and cemented in the operational ethos, and that the byproducts sought from post-incident analyses are far-and-away focused on remediation items and prevention.


Laura M.D. Maguire - Managing the Hidden Costs of Coordination
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Marisa R. Grayson - Cognitive Work of Hypothesis Exploration During Anomaly Response
Four incidents from web-based software companies reveal important aspects of anomaly response processes when incidents arise in web operations, two of which are discussed in this article. One particular cognitive function examined in detail is hypothesis generation and exploration, given the impact of obscure automation on engineers’ development of coherent models of the systems they manage. Each case was analyzed using the techniques and concepts of cognitive systems engineering. The set of cases provides a window into the cognitive work "above the line" in incident management of complex web-operation systems.


Richard I. Cook - Above the Line, Below the Line
Knowledge and understanding of below-the-line structure and function are continuously in flux. Near-constant effort is required to calibrate and refresh the understanding of the workings, dependencies, limitations, and capabilities of what is present there. In this dynamic situation no individual or group can ever know the system state. Instead, individuals and groups must be content with partial, fragmented mental models that require more or less constant updating and adjustment if they are to be useful.


A case study in how PayPal revitalized its tech stack by moving from Java, JSP and proprietary solutions to a Node.js web application stack with dust.js templating. Developer agility was our primary motivation, but along the way we had to tackle enterprise culture and teach people that JavaScript is no longer a 'toy', but a powerful tool to wield.

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