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A Conversation with Steve Bourne, Eric Allman, and Bryan Cantrill: In part two of their discussion, our editorial board members consider XP and Agile.

September 1, 2008

Topic: Development

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In the July/August 2008 issue of ACM Queue we published part one of a two-part discussion about the practice of software engineering. The goal was to gain some perspective on the tools, techniques, and methodologies that software engineers use in their daily lives. Three members of Queue’s editorial advisory board participated: Steve Bourne, Eric Allman, and Bryan Cantrill, each of whom has made significant and lasting real-world contributions to the field (for more information on each of the participants, see part one). In part two we rejoin their conversation as they discuss XP (Extreme Programming) and Agile.



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Dave Bone | Fri, 05 Dec 2008 22:22:40 UTC

Enjoyed the banter on programming and here's mine: What's your take on Literate programming? My mumbles are: Programming demands multi-media to reclue u into your code thoughts that seems to have an alzeheimer's effect on the author. How many time's has your own code revisits demanded comprehensive rebuild-ups? Imagine audio accompanying your code snippets along with other visuals...;}


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