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Discipline and Focus: Transcript of interview with Werner Vogels, CTO of Amazon

July 1, 2006

Topic: Computer Architecture

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When it comes to managing and deploying large scale systems and networks, discipline and focus matter more than specific technologies. In a conversation with ACM Queuecast host Mike Vizard, Amazon CTO Werner Vogels says the key to success is to have a relentless commitment to a modular computer architecture that makes it possible for the people who build the applications to also be responsible for running and deploying those systems within a common IT framework.



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