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Game Development

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Originally published in Queue vol. 6, no. 7
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Comments

(newest first)

imran husain | Thu, 04 Jun 2009 12:22:49 UTC

please sir give me tips about how i can write script for simple game.


Ketahazure | Fri, 09 Jan 2009 19:53:37 UTC

This is well written article. As a student in software engineering I found this to be very helpful. Thanks :)


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