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Notes from the Battlefield (Node.js at Walmart):

Node Summit

Get ready for a great talk by @eranhammer and awesome slides by @ChrisMCarrasco. SPEAKER: Eran Hammer, Senior Architect, Walmart

December 4, 2013

0 comments

Why Large Scale Mobile and E-Commerce Apps use Node.js:

Node Summit

One of the highlights from Node Summit 2013

December 4, 2013

0 comments

Evolution of Javascript Revisited (moderated by Erik Meijer):

Node Summit

One of the highlights from Node Summit 2013

December 4, 2013

0 comments

Node.js in the Digital Media Universe:

Node Summit

Learn why some of the biggest players in the Digital Media landscape are rapidly adopting Node.js in their development environments.

December 4, 2013

0 comments

Riding the N(ode) Train (Groupon):

Node Summit

Driving Groupon's business to the next level is the move from Ruby on Rails to Node.js.

December 4, 2013

0 comments

Embedding Node.js into a High-performance Network Datapath:

Node Summit

LineRate (now part of F5 Networks) provides a high-performance Layer 7 software network appliance that is fully programmable via Node.js embedded into its datapath.

December 4, 2013

0 comments

Release the Kraken: A Story of Node.js in the Enterprise (PayPal):

Node Summit

A case study in how PayPal revitalized its tech stack by moving from Java, JSP and proprietary solutions to a Node.js web application stack with dust.js templating. Developer agility was our primary motivation, but along the way we had to tackle enterprise culture and teach people that JavaScript is no longer a 'toy', but a powerful tool to wield.

December 4, 2013

0 comments

Queue Portrait: Michael Armbrust:

Queue Portraits

Marshall Kirk McKusick sits down to talk with Michael Armbrust about Scale Independence, a new technique for doing query optimization that allows developers to set an upper bound on the response time for their query result independent of the size of their database.

November 1, 2013

0 comments

Queue Portrait: Hilary Mason:

Queue Portraits

George Neville-Neil (aka Kode Vicious) sits down with Chief Data Scientist at Bitly, Hilary Mason, to discover more about what data science is, what the work of a data scientist entails, and how to build systems that make doing data science possible.

September 13, 2013

0 comments

Queue Portrait: Nicholas Zakas:

Queue Portraits

Front end engineering and web development used to be scoffed at by back-end engineers. However, working in the front end of a Web application is so much more than just HTML and CSS these days. Many Web applications can have a whole MVC inside the view, and understanding the client is paramount to delivering expected performance and app-like interaction. Nicholas Zakas takes us through his journey working on the client side, explains the evolution of front-end engineering, and answers questions like "when should you use jQuery?" Nicholas currently works at Box, and was previously the front-end tech lead for the Yahoo! homepage and a contributor to the YUI library. He is also a keynote speaker, and author of 4 books: Maintainable JavaScript, Professional JavaScript for Web Developers, High Performance JavaScript, and Professional Ajax.

July 1, 2013

0 comments

Queue Portrait: Kate Matsudaira:

Queue Portraits

Kate Matsudaira has just recently made a foray into novel territory as founder of her own company Pop Forms. Prior to that she worked in engineering leadership roles at companies such as Decide, SEOmoz, and Amazon. Her technical experience spans a wealth of areas, but she has consistently been involved with the construction of high performance distributed systems and systems addressing data collection and analysis. Kate is also well-known for her blog on which deals with issues in leadership and management. In this video, she discusses her experience in building and scaling out systems that collect and analyze large volumes of data. She covers key architectural choices in the design of these systems, delving into data partitioning in particular.

May 22, 2013

2 comments

Queue Portrait: Ang Cui

Queue Portraits

Ang Cui is a Ph.D. student at Columbia University in New York City. His research focuses on embedded devices such as routers, printers and VOIP phones. He is the inventor of a novel, host-based defense mechanism known as Symbiotes. Symbiotes are designed specifically to retrofit black-box, vulnerable, legacy embedded systems with sophisticated anti-exploitation mechanisms. In this video portrait, Ang describes how the extent of the embedded threat in real-world environments, discusses novel exploitation techniques for embedded systems--like enterprise networking equipment--and develops practical defenses for embedded systems that constitute our global communication substrate.

February 24, 2013

0 comments

Where Node.js goes from here:

Node Summit

Ryan Dahl and Isaac Schlueter discuss what is next for Node.js with Mikeal Rogers.

December 10, 2012

0 comments

Node Summit: Playing for Real - Gaming with Node.js:

Node Summit

Hear leading edge gaming companies discuss how Node.js, as a real-time technology has become central to their game app, platform and engine development strategies.

December 10, 2012

0 comments

Node Summit: PaaS Services and Tools:

Node Summit

Hear from some of the leading and emerging PaaS providers about their views on the importance of Node now and in the future, and their efforts to support Node.js.

December 10, 2012

0 comments

Node Summit: The Evolution of Javascript

Node Summit

Hear about the evolution of Javascript from a panel of experts who have taken it from an idea to where it stands today, and learn what is on the horizon for the little scripting language that became one of the most popular programming languages in the world.

December 10, 2012

0 comments

Node Summit: The Importance of Cross Platform

Node Summit

Joyent's Ryan Dahl, Microsoft's Gianugo Rabellino and Rackspace's Paul Querna discuss why Node.js is so important for the future of cross platform application development.

December 1, 2012

0 comments

Queue Portrait: Robert Watson

Queue Portraits

Robert Watson is a security researcher and open source developer at the University of Cambridge looking at the hardware-software interface. He talks to us about spanning industry and academia, the importance of open source in software research, and challenges facing research that spans traditional boundaries in computer science. We also learn a bit about CPU security, and why applications, rather than operating systems, are increasingly the focus of security research. What are the challenges in the evolving hardware-software interface? Could open source hardware provide a platform for hardware-software research? And why is current hardware part of the problem? George Neville-Neil, Queue's Kode Vicious, interviews Robert to learn about an exciting computer science research project at Cambridge.

October 14, 2012

3 comments

E2E: Erik Meijer and Dave Campbell: Data, Databases and the Cloud

Channel 9

Dave Campbell is a Technical Fellow at Microsoft and long time database architect. Today, Dave works on the hardest problems facing SQL's foray into the new world of cloud computing. His latest project in this space takes the form of SQL Azure. What is SQL Azure? What's the different with the cloud and what we already experience with SQL server running in a clustered environment and reachable via the Internet? How does this focus on cloud computing and impact the evolution of database design? What's going here? What's next? Erik Meijer, de facto E2E host and language designer, interviews Dave to get answers to some of these questions. Erik works for Dave, by the way, and as you can see that doesn't stop Erik from asking more than softball questions.

April 27, 2011

0 comments

Jim Gray, Part II of talking about Database Design:

Channel 9

Here's another 24 minutes with Jim Gray. He's one of the big minds behind SQL Server. Terra Service. And so much more. In this conversation we talk ab out architecture of Terra Service, among other database-related things. "I should talk about some of my lunatic fringe views on things," Jim starts ou t. Here's a hint, many of the bleeding edge database systems today are built with Jim's lunatic ideas.

April 25, 2011

0 comments

Jim Gray - A Talk with THE SQL Guru and Architect :

Channel 9

Jim Gray is a distinguished engineer in Microsoft's Scalable Servers Research Group and manager of our Bay Area Research Center. That doesn't even sta rt to do justice to the role Jim has played in the development of databases. You might know him as the guy behind Terra Service or Sky Server. We sat down with Jim for a couple of hours. Here's the first part. We talk about everything related to new database architectures and new trends in computing as well as his role in Terra Service.

April 20, 2011

0 comments

Why we're able to Google

Computing Research that Changed the World: Reflections and Perspectives

From the LoC symposium, sponsored by the Computing Community Consortium and the Computing Research Association

by Alfred Spector | March 25, 2009

2 comments

Information technologies to support the challenges of autism and related developmental disorders

Computing Research that Changed the World: Reflections and Perspectives

by Gregory D. Abowd|Gillian Hayes|Julie Kientz | March 25, 2009

0 comments

Pixels everywhere!

Computing Research that Changed the World: Reflections and Perspectives

by Pat Hanrahan | March 25, 2009

0 comments

Sensing everywhere!

Computing Research that Changed the World: Reflections and Perspectives

by Deborah Estrin | March 25, 2009

0 comments

Global information networks

Computing Research that Changed the World: Reflections and Perspectives

by Jon Kleinberg | March 25, 2009

0 comments

Personal environmental impact report (PEIR):

Computing Research that Changed the World: Reflections and Perspectives

by Deborah Estrin | March 25, 2009

0 comments

Computing and visualizing the future of medicine

Computing Research that Changed the World: Reflections and Perspectives

by Chris Johnson | March 25, 2009

0 comments

Learning to improve our lives

Computing Research that Changed the World: Reflections and Perspectives

by Daphne Koller | March 25, 2009

0 comments

Security of online information

Computing Research that Changed the World: Reflections and Perspectives

by Barbara Liskov | March 25, 2009

0 comments

Human computation

Computing Research that Changed the World: Reflections and Perspectives

by Luis von Ahn | March 25, 2009

0 comments

Autonomous flying robots:
a bird's eye view

Computing Research that Changed the World: Reflections and Perspectives

by Brian J. Julian | March 25, 2009

0 comments

Changing the world

Computing Research that Changed the World: Reflections and Perspectives

by Ed Lazowska | March 25, 2009

0 comments

Robots everywhere!

Computing Research that Changed the World: Reflections and Perspectives

by Rodney Brooks | March 25, 2009

0 comments

Zooming in on life

Computing Research that Changed the World: Reflections and Perspectives

by Gene Myers | March 25, 2009

0 comments

The magic of the "cloud":
supercomputers for everybody, everywhere

Computing Research that Changed the World: Reflections and Perspectives

by Eric Brewer | March 25, 2009

1 comments

Scientific computing and visualization for medical image analysis:

Computing Research that Changed the World: Reflections and Perspectives

by Ross Whitaker | March 25, 2009

0 comments

Supercomputers and supernetworks are transforming research

Computing Research that Changed the World: Reflections and Perspectives

by Larry Smarr | March 25, 2009

0 comments

Closing session

Computing Research that Changed the World: Reflections and Perspectives

by Ed Lazowska | March 25, 2009

0 comments

Building the WorldWide Telescope

ACM SIGMOD Record, Volume 37, Issue 2

This paper talks about the critical role that Jim Gray played in the creation of the WorldWide Telescope software. Contrary to what you might think it wasn't his database brilliance that made it happen, it was his generosity in sharing credit, inspiring, nurturing and connecting people, in this case that made it possible for the pieces to come into place and make it happen. Without Jim Gray's work with Alex Szalay on Sky Server and their ongoing support and encouragement, the software that is named in their honor would not exist today.

by Curtis Wong | June 1, 2008

1 comments

Building a Safer Web :
Web Tripwires and a New Browser Architecture

Stanford Videos

About the talk: Web content has shifted from simple documents to active programs, but web protocols and browsers have not evolved adequately to suppor t them. As a result, safety problems in web sites and web browsers now regularly make headlines, from browser exploits to ISPs that modify web pages. In this talk, I will discuss my research into improving the security and reliability of web content and browsers. For most of this talk, I will focus on one particular problem: the ability for intermediaries to modify web content in-flight. Our recent measurement study shows that many clients now re ceive web pages that have been altered before reaching the browser.

by Charles Reis | March 12, 2008

0 comments

Computing in Transition :

Stanford Videos

About the talk: Since shortly after its introduction, the microprocessor has dominated the design of electronic systems. The success of the microproce ssor, sustained by the march of Moore's law, stalled innovation in logic design for more than thirty years because programming became a substitute for hardware design. This was possible because the design goal of the personal computer and other microprocessor-based systems, representing the majority of the semiconductor market, was cost-performance. The advent of the value PC and the burgeoning of mobile devices have conspired to change the desig n goal to cost-performance per watt. Traditional microprocessor-based design cannot meet the challenge of the new design goal, so computing is in tran sition.

by Nick Tredennick, PhD | February 20, 2008

0 comments

Tracking the Internet into the 21st Century :

Stanford Videos

About the talk: Cerf will briefly review some key events in the history of the Internet, examine recent statistics, consider technical drivers and res earch issues still to be explored, look at current applications and their implications for social and economic effects and finish up with some future challenges and an update on the interplanetary extension of the Internet. About the speaker: Vint Cerf is VP and Chief Internet Evangelist of Google. He served as the chairman of the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers from 2000-2007, was the founding President of the Internet Societ y, worked as Senior Vice President at MCI, VP of the Corporation for National Research Initiatives, developed MCI Mail, and led the Internetting resea rch program at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency from 1976-1982.

by Vinton G Cerf | January 9, 2008

0 comments

Smartweb:
multimodal web services on the road

Proceedings of the 15th international conference on Multimedia

SmartWeb provides a context-aware user interface to web services, so that it can support the mobile user in different roles, e.g. as a car driver, a motorbiker, or a pedestrian. It provides a symmetric multimodal dialogue system [2] combining speech, gesture, haptic and video input with speech, haptic, video and acoustic output. It goes beyond traditional keyword search engines like Google by delivering higher quality results that are adapted to the mobile user's current task and situation. In mobile situations, users don't want to deal with hypertext lists of retrieved webpages, but simply want an answer to their query.

by Wolfgang Wahlster | September 29, 2007

0 comments

Data mining at the crossroads:
successes, failures and learning from them

Proceedings of the 13th ACM SIGKDD international conference on Knowledge discovery and data mining

Since the 1989 workshop on knowledge discovery in databases, the field has seen sustained growth and interest and has attained significant maturity. T he main objectives of this panel will be to reflect on the successes and failures in the field of data mining over the last eighteen years and to exam ine what insights we can take with us as we move forward.

by Srinivasan Parthasarathy | August 12, 2007

0 comments

From mining the web to inventing the new sciences underlying the internet:

Proceedings of the 13th ACM SIGKDD international conference on Knowledge discovery and data mining

This is an abstract of the Invited Keynote Presentation to be presented at KDD-07. As the Internet continues to change the way we live, find informati on, communicate, and do business, it has also been taking on a dramatically increasing role in marketing and advertising. Unlike any prior mass medium , the Internet is a unique medium when it comes to interactivity and offers an ability to target and program messaging at the individual level. Couple d with its uniqueness in the richness of the data that is available for measurability, in the variety of ways to utilize the data, and in the great de pendence of effective marketing on applications that are heavily data-driven, makes data mining and statistical data analysis, modeling, and reporting an essential mission-critical part of running the on-line business.

by Usama M. Fayyad | August 12, 2007

0 comments

PCU:
the programmable culling unit

ACM SIGGRAPH 2007 papers

Culling techniques have always been a central part of computer graphics, but graphics hardware still lack efficient and flexible support for culling. To improve the situation, we introduce the programmable culling unit, which is as flexible as the fragment program unit and capable of quickly culling entire blocks of fragments. Furthermore, it is very easy for the developer to use the PCU as culling programs can be automatically derived from fragm ent programs containing a discard instruction. Our PCU can be integrated into an existing fragment program unit with a modest hardware overhead of onl y about 10%.

by Jon Hasselgren|Thomas Akenine-Muller | July 29, 2007

0 comments

Presentation: 50 in 50

Proceedings of the third ACM SIGPLAN conference on History of programming languages

Languages-what's to learn from them? Relics of the past; we know how to design them / to use them. Heh, but what is programming, and what role do programming languages play in that process? We have learn ed a lot over the last five decades: organizing principles, established conventions, theory, fashions, and fads. \"Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.\" In this talk we survey what we think are the most important lessons of the past that future programmers, and future programming language designers, ought not forget. We illustrate each lesson by discussing specific programming languages of the past, and endeavor to shine what light we can on the future.

by Guy Steele, Richard P. Gabriel | June 9, 2007

4 comments

Botnets Anticipating Failure :

Stanford Videos

About the talk: Detecting global abuse patterns with realtime black lists, spamtraps and honey pots. Understanding what your network is doing to the rest of the community is difficult, we discuss how to use our tools to understand how your network is abusing other networks and show graphs and stats of trends globally and within the United States. About the speaker: Rick Wesson is the CEO of Support Intelligence which provides a security monitoring service for critical networks, the service targets compromised hosts and provides alerts to operations staff in real time so breaches can be shut down immediately, before serious problems arise.

by Rick Wesson, CEO | June 6, 2007

0 comments

Energy Harvesting for Wireless Sensors :

Stanford Videos

About the talk: Harvesting energy from environmental sources can extend wireless sensor network node lifetime beyond the limits of battery technology. Potential energy sources include solar, thermal, and mechanical vibration, each of which has specific advantages and disadvantages. However, they all have in common that the output power from an energy harvester scales poorly with decreasing device dimensions and is highly variable. These two chall enges can be addressed by appropriate circuit and system design which both decreases the average power consumption and enables a user-level tradeoff b etween accurate processing and energy dissipation. In this talk, we will give an overview of energy harvesting mechanisms, describe circuit and system microarchitecture techniques for energy harvesting wireless sensors, and give specific examples of designing for energy harvesting applications.

by Raj Amirtharajah | May 30, 2007

0 comments

Off-the-Record Messaging:
Useful Security and Privacy for IM

Stanford Videos

About the talk: Instant messaging (IM) is an increasingly popular mode of communication on the Internet. Although it is used for personal and private conversations, it is not at all a private medium. Not only are all of the messages unencrypted and unauthenticated, but they are all routed through a central server, forming a convenient interception point for an attacker. Users would benefit from being able to have truly private conversations over IM, combining the features of encryption, authentication, deniability, and forward secrecy, while working within their existing IM infrastructure. In this talk, I will discuss "Off-the-Record Messaging" (OTR), a widely used software tool for secure and private instant messaging.

by Ian Goldberg | May 23, 2007

0 comments

Stream Programming:
Multicore Made Practical

Stanford Videos

About the talk: Executing an application on a multicore processor can improve performance by an order of magnitude or more but poses daunting programming obstacles. First, execution needs to be parallelized across multiple processor cores and synchronized when necessary. Second, data accesses that assume an implicit cache need to be converted into efficient explicit on-chip memory management to keep up with improved processing speed. Compilers that attempt to fully automate this transition suffer from generally poor and always unpredictable results and lack the transparency that enables a program mer to compensate when the compiler fails. Most often, this transition is performed manually by expert programmers.

by Peter Mattson | May 16, 2007

0 comments

Multi-core, Multiprocessor, and Memory Hierarchies:
An Application Developer's View of Next Generation Systems Enablement

Stanford Videos

About the talk: Current advances in microprocessor and system technology have led to a surprising array of scale out system enablement at a commodity level driven by the inherent Moore's Law limitations of simple frequency scaling to meet performance needs. Massively multi-threaded technology, scale-out clusters on commodity networks, and heterogeneous "systems on a chip" (SoC) with advanced memory hierarchy performance are currently available to a wide array of industry application developers. However, although systems are available with increasing scalability and advaced/dedicated performance components, many applications, even in technical computing, do not scale beyond 8 way for even a single ISA/Operating System architecture.

by Catherine H. Crawford, PhD | May 9, 2007

0 comments

Taking Concurrency Seriously:
New Directions in Multiprocessor Synchronization

Stanford Videos

About the talk: Computer architecture is about to undergo, if not another revolution, then a vigorous shaking-up. The major chip manufacturers have, for the time being, simply given up trying to make processors run faster. Instead, they have recently started shipping "multicore" architectures, in which multiple processors (cores) communicate directly through shared hardware caches, providing increased concurrency instead of increased clock speed. As a result, system designers and software engineers can no longer rely on increasing clock speed to hide software bloat. Instead, they must somehow learn to make effective use of increasing parallelism. This adaptation will not be easy. Conventional synchronization techniques based on locks and conditions are unlikely to be effective in such a demanding environment.

by Maurice Herlihy | May 2, 2007

0 comments

Software Not Provided:
Challenges, Experiences, and Opportunities in Supporting Communities and Democracy

Stanford Videos

About the talk: Software that gets produced is generally (a) profitable, (b) desired by software developers for their own use, (c) easy to write, and/or (d) similar to something that already exists. But these criteria leave a large class of software underprovided. We argue, in particular, that software that supports community and democratic (rather than individual) goals for under-resourced populations is very useful and needed. But it tends not to get produced, or is difficult to sustain, because it requires approaches that are novel and complex, is difficult to fund, and does not fill a void in the lives of enough software developers.

by Todd Davies|Jerry Feldman | April 18, 2007

0 comments

Nanomanufacturing Technologies Extending the Silicon Roadmap and Enabling New Applications:

Stanford Videos

About the talk: Driven by Moore's Law, nanoelectronics appears to be the largest single nanotechnology end market for the foreseeable future. Underlyi ng the increased levels of integration and resulting cost reduction have been a multitude of materials, process and productivity innovations that have enabled the semiconductor industry today to produce well over 1018 transistors per year at costs down to a few nanodollars per transistor. This prese ntation explores technology challenges in IC nanomanufacturing and reviews the most likely directions needed to sustain the pervasive growth of semico nductor content. Other applications of related nanomanufacturing technologies are also examined, most notably flat panel displays and photovoltaics, w here the combination of materials engineering and highly productive processing platforms have spurred significant high growth markets.

by Mark Pinto | April 4, 2007

0 comments

Flash Player ActionScript Virtual Machine (Tamarin):

Stanford Videos

About the talk: The Adobe Flash Player is almost universally available on desktop computers, yet many people are not even aware of its existence or of its capabilities. It is a client application that is accessible within most web browsers and features support for vector and raster graphics, audio a nd video streaming and a scripting language; ActionScript. The scripting language is executed by a virtual machine (VM), the internals of which, will be the focus of this talk. I will also talk about Adobe's recent release of the source code of this VM to the open source community along with Mozilla's plan for embedding this module into the Firefox web browser.

by Rick Reitmaier | December 6, 2006

0 comments

Computing on the GPU GeForce 8800 and NVIDIA CUDA:

Stanford Videos

About the talk: Many researchers have observed that general purpose computing with programmable graphics hardware (GPUs) has shown promise to solve ma ny of the world's compute intensive problems, many orders of magnitude faster the conventional CPUs. The challenge has been working within the constra ints of a graphics programming environment to leverage this huge performance potential. GPU computing with CUDA is a new approach to computing where h undreds of on-chip processor cores simultaneously communicate and cooperate to solve complex computing problems, transforming the GPU into a massively parallel processor. The NVIDIA C-compiler for the GPU provides a complete development environment gives developers the tools they need to solve new p roblems in computation-intensive applications such as product design, data analysis, technical computing, and game physics.

by Ian Buck | November 29, 2006

0 comments

25 Years at PDI:

Stanford Videos

About the talk: Take a personal journey through a quarter century of changes in the computer animation industry with Richard Chuang, co-founder of PDI . Get a glimpse of the evolution of a Silicon Valley startup in the early 80's through becoming part of a Hollywood studio that produced the most succ essful animated film ever, Shrek 2. Richard will guide you through the challenges that span many cycles of changes in the entertainment industry as we ll as the changes in technology. About the speaker: A co-founder of PDI over 25 years ago, Richard Chuang helped create the studio's powerful propriet ary animation system, which the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences recognized with a Technical Achievement Award in 1997.

by Richard Chuang | November 15, 2006

0 comments

The Need, Evolution, and Detail of WLAN Security:

Stanford Videos

About the talk: This talk will address the need, evolution, and detail of WLAN security. From dial-up and PPP to 802.11 and WPA, the presentation will trace how the changing connectivity landscape drove the development of new security protocols, especially in the case of wireless networks. Along the way, the talk will describe the dependencies and politics, the ins-and-outs, of the standards development process as seen from the perspective of a d esigner and implementor of wireless security protocols. About the speaker: Kevin Hayes is currently a Distinguished Engineer at Atheros Communications where he works on software for security and platform support.

by Kevin Hayes | November 8, 2006

0 comments

A Structured Orchestration Language:

Stanford Videos

We propose a programming language, called Orc for orchestration, that supports a structured way of orchestrating distributed services. This model assu mes that basic services, like sequential computation and data manipulation, are implemented by primitive sites. Orc provides constructs to orchestrate the concurrent invocation of sites to achieve a goal: acquire data from one or more remote services, calculate with these data, and invoke yet other remote services with the results, handle time-outs and failures, and respond to notifications. We discuss the programming language and demonstrate its effectiveness in a variety of applications. Orc has a strong theoretical foundation that supports modular composition and analysis of concurrent prog rams.

by Jayadev "Jay" Misra | October 26, 2006

0 comments

Measurements vs. Bits:
Compressed Sensing meets Information Theory

Stanford Videos

Stanford EE Computer Systems Colloquium About the talk: Sensors, signal processing hardware, and algorithms are under increasing pressure to accommo date ever larger data sets; ever faster sampling and processing rates; ever lower power consumption; and radically new sensing modalities. Fortunately , over the past few decades, there have been enormous increases in computational power. This progress has motivated Compressed Sensing (CS), an emergi ng field based on the revelation that optimization routines can reconstruct a sparse signal from a small number of linear projections of the signal. T he implications of CS are promising for many applications and enable the design of new kinds of cameras and analog-to-digital converters.

by Dror Baron | October 18, 2006

0 comments

RecipeSheet:
creating, combining and controlling information processors

Proceedings of the 19th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology

Many tasks require users to extract information from diverse sources, to edit or process this information locally, and to explore how the end results are affected by changes in the information or in its processing. We present the RecipeSheet, a general-purpose tool for assisting users in such tasks. The RecipeSheet lets users create information processors, called recipes, which may take input in a variety of forms such as text, Web pages, or XML, and produce results in a similar variety of forms. The processing carried out by a recipe may be specified using a macro or query language, of which we currently support Rexx, Smalltalk and XQuery, or by capturing the behaviour of a Web application or Web service.

by Aran Lunzer|Kasper Hornbok | October 15, 2006

0 comments

Comparing and managing multiple versions of slide presentations:

Proceedings of the 19th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology

Despite the ubiquity of slide presentations, managing multiple presentations remains a challenge. Understanding how multiple versions of a presentatio n are related to one another, assembling new presentations from existing presentations, and collaborating to create and edit presentations are difficu lt tasks. In this paper, we explore techniques for comparing and managing multiple slide presentations. We propose a general comparison framework for computing similarities and differences between slides. Based on this framework we develop an interactive tool for visually comparing multiple presenta tions. The interactive visualization facilitates understanding how presentations have evolved over time.

by Steven M. Drucker|Georg Petschnigg|Maneesh Agrawala | October 15, 2006

0 comments

New Architectures for a New Biology:

Stanford Videos

Stanford EE Computer Systems Colloquium Some of the most important outstanding questions in the fields of biology, chemistry, and medicine remain uns olved as a result of our limited understanding of the structure, behavior and interaction of biologically significant molecules. The laws of physics t hat determine the form and function of these biomolecules are well understood. Current technology, however, does not allow us to simulate the effect o f these laws with sufficient accuracy, and for a sufficient period of time, to answer many of the questions that biologists, biochemists, and biomedic al researchers are most anxious to answer. This talk will describe the current state of the art in biomolecular simulation and explore the potential r ole of high-performance computing technologies in extending current capabilities.

by David E. Shaw | October 11, 2006

0 comments

The Future Evolution of High-Performance Microprocessors:

Stanford Videos

About the talk: The evolution of high-performance microprocessors has recently gone through a significant inflection point. First, the power of high p erformance microprocessors has increased rapidly over the last two decades, even as device switching energies have been significantly reduced by suppl y voltage scaling. However future voltage scaling will be limited by minimum practical threshold voltages. Current high-performance microprocessors ar e already near limits of acceptable power dissipation. Second, the marginal utility of additional single-core complexity has diminished due to a numbe r of factors. Increases in processor clock frequency have stagnated. The competition for higher clock rates has been replaced by a competition for the number of cores per socket.

by Norman P. Jouppi | September 26, 2006

0 comments

Virtual reality-based spatial skills assessment and its role in computer graphics education

ACM SIGGRAPH 2006 Educators program

One element of using contemporary computer graphics tools is the creation of accurate 3D geometry for a variety of purposes. As part of developing effective instructional experiences for students engaged in such activities, computer graphics educators must take into account a person's spatial abilities and skills. Literature has shown these abilities are widely considered to be a significant predictor of the probability of a person's success in computer graphics-related professions. Typical spatial skills assessments examine such abilities as mental rotations, spatial visualization, and spatial perception all of which are involved in the creation of 3D computer graphics. However, most of these assessment instruments are paper-based, and the nature of the human ability being measured is such that the paper-and-pencil format currently used has no mapping to the target construct domain - namely 3D computer graphics in the real world.

by Nathan W. Hartman|Patrick E. Connolly|Jeffrey W. Gilger|Gary R. Bertoline|Justin Heisler | July 30, 2006

0 comments

Creativity:

Companion to the 20th annual ACM SIGPLAN conference on Object-oriented programming, systems, languages, and applications

In his role as United States Poet Laureate, Robert Hass spent two years battling American illiteracy, armed with the mantra, "imagination makes commun ities." He crisscrossed the country speaking at Rotary Club meetings, raising money to organize conferences such as "Watershed," which brought togethe r noted novelists, poets, and storytellers to talk about writing, nature, and community. For Hass, everything is connected. When he works to heighten literacy, he is also working to promote awareness about the environment. Hass believes that natural beauty must be tended to and that caring for a pla ce means knowing it intimately. Poets, especially, need to pay constant attention to the interaction of mind and environment.

by Robert Hass | October 16, 2005

0 comments

The end of users:

Companion to the 20th annual ACM SIGPLAN conference on Object-oriented programming, systems, languages, and applications

Over the past 20 years, user interface designers and usability engineers have studied and refined human-computer interaction techniques with the goal of improving people's productivity and experience. But the target of these efforts, "the end-user," is fast becoming a thing of the past. Many people now construct software on their own, building artifacts that range from email filters to spreadsheet simulations to interactive web applications. Thes e individuals are use-developers: they build ad hoc solutions to everyday computing needs.Will use-developers help to resolve the software crisis? Giv en the right tools, people and groups may be able to rapidly develop custom solutions to many context-specific computing requirements, eliminating the wait for IT professionals to analyze and engineer a solution.

by Mary Beth Rosson | October 16, 2005

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Modeling by example:

ACM SIGGRAPH 2004 Papers

In this paper, we investigate a data-driven synthesis approach to constructing 3D geometric surface models. We provide methods with which a user can s earch a large database of 3D meshes to find parts of interest, cut the desired parts out of the meshes with intelligent scissoring, and composite them together in different ways to form new objects. The main benefit of this approach is that it is both easy to learn and able to produce highly detaile d geometric models -- the conceptual design for new models comes from the user, while the geometric details come from examples in the database. The fo cus of the paper is on the main research issues motivated by the proposed approach: (1) interactive segmentation of 3D surfaces, (2) shape-based searc h to find 3D models with parts matching a query, and (3) composition of parts to form new models.

by Thomas Funkhouser|Michael Kazhdan|Philip Shilane|Patrick Min|William Kiefer|Ayellet Tal|Szymon Rusinkiewicz|David Dobkin | August 1, 2004

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