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Don't Settle for Eventual Consistency

Stronger properties for low-latency geo-replicated storage

by Wyatt Lloyd, Michael J. Freedman, Michael Kaminsky, David G. Andersen | April 21, 2014

1 comments

A Primer on Provenance

Better understanding of data requires tracking its history and context.

by Lucian Carata, Sherif Akoush, Nikilesh Balakrishnan, Thomas Bytheway, Ripduman Sohan, Margo Seltzer, Andy Hopper | April 10, 2014

1 comments

Eventually Consistent: Not What You Were Expecting?

Methods of quantifying consistency (or lack thereof) in eventually consistent storage systems

by Wojciech Golab, Muntasir R. Rahman, Alvin AuYoung, Kimberly Keeton, Xiaozhou (Steve) Li | February 18, 2014

0 comments

Provenance in Sensor Data Management

A cohesive, independent solution for bringing provenance to scientific research

by Zachary Hensley, Jibonananda Sanyal, Joshua New | January 23, 2014

CACM This article appears in print in Communications of the ACM, Volume 57 Issue 2

0 comments

Eventual Consistency Today: Limitations, Extensions, and Beyond

How can applications be built on eventually consistent infrastructure given no guarantee of safety?

by Peter Bailis, Ali Ghodsi | April 9, 2013

1 comments

Hazy: Making it Easier to Build and Maintain Big-data Analytics

Racing to unleash the full potential of big data with the latest statistical and machine-learning techniques.

by Arun Kumar, Feng Niu, Christopher Ré | January 23, 2013

0 comments

All Your Database Are Belong to Us

In the big open world of the cloud, highly available distributed objects will rule.

by Erik Meijer | July 23, 2012

CACM This article appears in print in Communications of the ACM, Volume 55 Issue 9

3 comments

How Will Astronomy Archives Survive the Data Tsunami?

Astronomers are collecting more data than ever. What practices can keep them ahead of the flood?

by G. Bruce Berriman, Steven L. Groom | October 18, 2011

CACM This article appears in print in Communications of the ACM, Volume 54 Issue 12

1 comments

The World According to LINQ

Big data is about more than size, and LINQ is more than up to the task.

by Erik Meijer | August 30, 2011

CACM This article appears in print in Communications of the ACM, Volume 54 Issue 10

5 comments

If You Have Too Much Data, then “Good Enough” Is Good Enough

In today's humongous database systems, clarity may be relaxed, but business needs can still be met.

by Pat Helland | May 23, 2011

5 comments

Deduplicating Devices Considered Harmful

A good idea, but it can be taken too far

by David Rosenthal | May 17, 2011

2 comments

Storage Strife

Beware keeping data in binary format

by George V. Neville-Neil | May 5, 2011

0 comments

Scalable SQL

How do large-scale sites and applications remain SQL-based?

by Michael Rys | April 19, 2011

CACM This article appears in print in Communications of the ACM, Volume 54 Issue 6

3 comments

A co-Relational Model of Data for Large Shared Data Banks

Contrary to popular belief, SQL and noSQL are really just two sides of the same coin.

by Erik Meijer, Gavin Bierman | March 18, 2011

CACM This article appears in print in Communications of the ACM, Volume 54 Issue 4

23 comments

The Case Against Data Lock-in

Want to keep your users? Just make it easy for them to leave.

by Brian W Fitzpatrick, JJ Lueck | October 8, 2010

4 comments

Data in Flight

How streaming SQL technology can help solve the Web 2.0 data crunch.

by Julian Hyde | December 10, 2009

CACM This article appears in print in Communications of the ACM, Volume 53 Issue 1

1 comments

Other People's Data

Companies have access to more types of external data than ever before. How can they integrate it most effectively?

by Stephen Petschulat | November 13, 2009

CACM This article appears in print in Communications of the ACM, Volume 53 Issue 1

0 comments

The Pathologies of Big Data

Scale up your datasets enough and all your apps will come undone. What are the typical problems and where do the bottlenecks generally surface?

by Adam Jacobs | July 6, 2009

CACM This article appears in print in Communications of the ACM, Volume 52 Issue 8

2 comments

A Tribute to Jim Gray

Computer science attracts many very smart people, but a few stand out above the others, somehow blessed with a kind of creativity that most of us are denied. Names such as Alan Turing, Edsger Dijkstra, and John Backus come to mind. Jim Gray is another.

by Eric Allman | July 28, 2008

0 comments

Exposing the ORM Cache

In the early 1990s, when object-oriented languages emerged into the mainstream of software development, a noticeable surge in productivity occurred as developers saw new and better ways to create software programs. Although the new and efficient object programming paradigm was hailed and accepted by a growing number of organizations, relational database management systems remained the preferred technology for managing enterprise data. Thus was born ORM (object-relational mapping), out of necessity, and the complex challenge of saving the persistent state of an object environment in a relational database subsequently became known as the object-relational impedance mismatch.

by Michael Keith, Randy Stafford | July 28, 2008

0 comments

ORM in Dynamic Languages

A major component of most enterprise applications is the code that transfers objects in and out of a relational database. The easiest solution is often to use an ORM (object-relational mapping) framework, which allows the developer to declaratively define the mapping between the object model and database schema and express database-access operations in terms of objects. This high-level approach significantly reduces the amount of database-access code that needs to be written and boosts developer productivity.

by Chris Richardson | July 28, 2008

CACM This article appears in print in Communications of the ACM, Volume 52 Issue 4

0 comments

A Conversation with Michael Stonebraker and Margo Seltzer

Over the past 30 years Michael Stonebraker has left an indelible mark on the database technology world.

by John Stanik | June 7, 2007

0 comments

Beyond Relational Databases

There is more to data access than SQL.

by Margo Seltzer | April 21, 2005

CACM This article appears in print in Communications of the ACM, Volume 51 Issue 7

1 comments

Databases of Discovery

Open-ended database ecosystems promote new discoveries in biotech. Can they help your organization, too?

by James Ostell | April 21, 2005

0 comments

A Call to Arms

Long anticipated, the arrival of radically restructured database architectures is now finally at hand.

by Jim Gray, Mark Compton | April 21, 2005

1 comments

A Conversation with Pat Selinger

Leading the way to manage the world's information

by James Hamilton | April 21, 2005

0 comments

A Conversation with Bruce Lindsay

If you were looking for an expert in designing database management systems, you couldn't find many more qualified than IBM Fellow Bruce Lindsay. He has been involved in the architecture of RDBMS (relational database management systems) practically since before there were such systems. In 1978, fresh out of graduate school at the University of California at Berkeley with a Ph.D. in computer science, he joined IBM's San Jose Research Laboratory, where researchers were then working on what would become the foundation for IBM's SQL and DB2 database products.

by Steve Bourne | December 6, 2004

2 comments

A Conversation with Steve Hagan

Oracle Corporation, which bills itself as the world's largest enterprise software company, with $10 billion in revenues, some 40,000 employees, and operations in 60 countries, has ample opportunity to put distributed development to the test. Among those on the front lines of Oracle's distributed effort is Steve Hagan, the engineering vice president of the Server Technologies division, based at Oracle's New England Development Center in Nashua, New Hampshire, located clear across the country from Oracle's Redwood Shores, California, headquarters.

by Tony Wasserman | January 29, 2004

0 comments