Web Services

Vol. 1 No. 1 – March 2003

Web Services

Interviews

Interview with Adam Bosworth

Adam Bosworth's contributions to the development and evolution of Web Services began before the phrase "Web Services" had even been coined. That's because while working as a senior manager at Microsoft in the late '90s, he became one of the people most central to the effort to define an industry XML specification. While at Microsoft, he also served as General Manager of the company's WebData organization (with responsibility for defining Microsoft's long-term XML strategy) in addition to heading up the effort to develop the HTML engine used in Internet Explorer 4 & 5. Now, as Chief Architect and Senior Vice President of Advanced Development at BEA Systems, Bosworth is much more directly involved in shaping the future of Web Services.

A Conversation with Adam Bosworth

Adam Bosworthýs contributions to the development and evolution of Web Services began before the phrase "Web Services" had even been coined.

Adam Bosworth’s contributions to the development and evolution of Web Services began before the phrase “Web Services” had even been coined. That’s because while working as a senior manager at Microsoft in the late ‘90s, he became one of the people most central to the effort to define an industry XML specification. While at Microsoft, he also served as General Manager of the company’s WebData organization (with responsibility for defining Microsoft’s long-term XML strategy) in addition to heading up the effort to develop the HTML engine used in Internet Explorer 4 & 5. Now, as Chief Architect and Senior Vice President of Advanced Development at BEA Systems, Bosworth is much more directly involved in shaping the future of Web Services.

To press Bosworth for insights into the possibilities and hazards he sees ahead, Queue asked Marshall Kirk McKusick - former head of the UC Berkeley Computer Systems Research Group (CSRG)—to fire off a few questions regarding his greatest Web Services concerns. Besides overseeing the development and release of 4.3BSD and 4.4BSD, McKusick is also renowned for his work on virtual memory systems and fast file system performance—and in recent years he’s also achieved prominence as one of the leaders of the Open Source movement.

Articles

An Open Web Services Architecture

The name of the game is web services - sophisticated network software designed to bring us what we need, when we need it, through any device we choose. We are getting closer to this ideal, as in recent years the client/server model has evolved into web-based computing, which is now evolving into the web services model. In this article, I will discuss Sun Microsystems' take on web services, specifically Sun ONE: an open, standards-based web services framework. I'll share with you Sun's decision-making rationales regarding web services, and discuss directions we are moving in.

An Open Web Services Architecture

The name of the game is web services.

Stans Kleijnen and Srikanth Raju, Sun Microsystems

The name of the game is web services—sophisticated network software designed to bring us what we need, when we need it, through any device we choose. We are getting closer to this ideal, as in recent years the client/server model has evolved into web-based computing, which is now evolving into the web services model (see Figure 1). In this article, I will discuss Sun Microsystems’ take on web services, specifically Sun ONE: an open, standards-based web services framework. I’ll share with you Sun’s decision-making rationales regarding web services, and discuss directions we are moving in.

One of the basic questions in developer’s minds when starting to write Web Services is—what language to use? While it is possible to write web services in any language including Perl, Fortran etc., we strongly believe that the Java™ Programming Language is the most appropriate because of its ability to scale from the tiniest of JavaCards all the way up to the mighty Enterprise Edition. [More comparisons of Java Platform vs. other platforms are discussed later]. With the Java Platform, programmers can readily define operations and place that logic on virtually any computer system, regardless of the underlying hardware architecture or operating system—a distinct advantage in the diverse world of web services.

by Stan Kleijnen, Srikanth Raju

Opinion

Securing the Edge

Common wisdom has it that enterprises need firewalls to secure their networks. In fact, as enterprise network practitioners can attest, the "must-buy-firewall" mentality has pervaded the field.

Securing The Edge

Common wisdom has it that enterprises need firewalls to secure their networks.

Avi Freedman, Akamai Technologies

Common wisdom has it that enterprises need firewalls to secure their networks. In fact, as enterprise network practitioners can attest, the "must-buy-firewall" mentality has pervaded the field.

Maybe you’re a believer too. But if you have any geeks working for you, do you realize they may have tunnels behind your firewall to their home machines? Oh, so you don't allow ports other than 80? That's okay--HTTPS-based VPNs, or users running ssh on port 80 to forward ports or run network extensions, are all growing in popularity.

by Avi Freedman

Articles

The Deliberate Revolution

While detractors snub XML web services as CORBA with a weight problem, industry cheerleaders say these services are ushering in a new age of seamless integrated computing. But for those of us whose jobs don't involve building industry excitement, what do web services offer?

The Deliberate Revolution

Transforming Integration With XML Web Services

Mike Burner, Microsoft

While detractors snub XML web services as CORBA with a weight problem, industry cheerleaders say these services are ushering in a new age of seamless integrated computing. But for those of us whose jobs don't involve building industry excitement, what do web services offer?

The vast investment in Internet infrastructure and telecommunications over the past decade is making the unthinkable eminently achievable. Organizations can now retrieve up-to-the-minute data at run-time from from its canonical source, partners and customers. And where applications have traditionally bound functionality together, it now is practical to access application logic at run-time, from hosted services updated dynamically to keep current with evolving business processes.

by Mike Burner

Web Services: Promises and Compromises

Much of web services' initial promise will be realized via integration within the enterprise, either with legacy applications or new business processes that span organizational silos. Enterprises need organizational structures that support this new paradigm.

Web Services: Promises and Compromises

Much of web services' initial promise will be realized via integration within the enterprise.

Ali Arsanjani, Brent Hailpern, Joanne Martin, And Peri Tarr

Much of web services’ initial promise will be realized via integration within the enterprise, either with legacy applications or new business processes that span organizational silos. Enterprises need organizational structures that support this new paradigm.

Web services are the latest software craze: the promise of full-fledged application software that needn’t be installed on your local computer, but that allow systems running in different environments to interoperate via XML and other web standards. Much of the hoopla surrounding web services revolves around the nirvana of inter-organizational distributed computing, where supply chains can be integrated across continents with applications built from small parts supplied on demand by various vendors. To get to this place, we need to chisel down current methods and build a component-based architecture of large-grained, message aware, enterprise scale, and highly re-configurable enterprise components exposed as web services.

by Joanne Martin, Ali Arsanjani, Peri Tarr, Brent Hailpern