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Vol. 14 No. 6 – November-December 2016

Authentication

Are You Load Balancing Wrong?

Anyone can use a load balancer. Using them properly is much more difficult.

A reader contacted me recently to ask if it is better to use a load balancer to add capacity or to make a service more resilient to failure. The answer is: both are appropriate uses of a load balancer. The problem, however, is that most people who use load balancers are doing it wrong.

by Thomas A. Limoncelli

Heterogeneous Computing: Here to Stay

Hardware and Software Perspectives

Mentions of the buzzword heterogeneous computing have been on the rise in the past few years and will continue to be heard for years to come, because heterogeneous computing is here to stay. What is heterogeneous computing, and why is it becoming the norm? How do we deal with it, from both the software side and the hardware side? This article provides answers to some of these questions and presents different points of view on others.

by Mohamed Zahran

Uninitialized Reads

Understanding the proposed revisions to the C language

Most developers understand that reading uninitialized variables in C is a defect, but some do it anyway. What happens when you read uninitialized objects is unsettled in the current version of the C standard (C11).3 Various proposals have been made to resolve these issues in the planned C2X revision of the standard. Consequently, this is a good time to understand existing behaviors as well as proposed revisions to the standard to influence the evolution of the C language. Given that the behavior of uninitialized reads is unsettled in C11, prudence dictates eliminating uninitialized reads from your code.

by Robert C. Seacord

Time, but Faster

A computing adventure about time through the looking glass

The first premise was summed up perfectly by the late Douglas Adams in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy: "Time is an illusion. Lunchtime doubly so." The concept of time, when colliding with decoupled networks of computers that run at billions of operations per second, is... well, the truth of the matter is that you simply never really know what time it is. That is why Leslie Lamport's seminal paper on Lamport timestamps was so important to the industry, but this article is actually about wall-clock time, or a reasonably useful estimation of it.

by Theo Schlossnagle

The Chess Player who Couldn't Pass the Salt

AI: Soft and hard, weak and strong, narrow and general

The problem inherent in almost all nonspecialist work in AI is that humans actually don't understand intelligence very well in the first place. Now, computer scientists often think they understand intelligence because they have so often been the "smart" kid, but that's got very little to do with understanding what intelligence actually is. In the absence of a clear understanding of how the human brain generates and evaluates ideas, which may or may not be a good basis for the concept of intelligence, we have introduced numerous proxies for intelligence, the first of which is game-playing behavior.

by George Neville-Neil