DNS

Vol. 7 No. 10 – November 2009

DNS

Articles

Other People's Data

Companies have access to more types of external data than ever before. How can they integrate it most effectively?

Other People's Data

Stephen Petschulat, SAP

Companies have access to more types of external data than ever before. How can they integrate it most effectively?

Every organization bases some of its critical decisions on external data sources. In addition to traditional flat file data feeds, Web services and Web pages are playing an increasingly important role in data warehousing. The growth of Web services has made data feeds easily consumable at the departmental and even end-user levels. There are now more than 1,500 publicly available Web services and thousands of data mashups ranging from retail sales data to weather information to United States census data.3 These mashups are evidence that when users need information, they will find a way to get it. An effective enterprise information management strategy needs to take into account both internal and external data.

Types of External Data

External data sources vary in their structure and methods of access. Some are well understood and have been a part of data-warehousing flows for many years: securities data, corporate information, credit risk data, and address/postal code lookup. These are typically formally structured, contain the "base" (most detailed) level of data, and are available through established data service providers in multiple formats. The most common access method is still flat files over FTP.

by Stephen Petschulat

What DNS Is Not

DNS is many things to many people - perhaps too many things to too many people.

What DNS Is Not

Paul Vixie, Internet Systems Consortium

DNS is many things to many people—perhaps too many things to too many people.

DNS (Domain Name System) is a hierarchical, distributed, autonomous, reliable database. The first and only of its kind, it offers realtime performance levels to a global audience with global contributors. Every TCP/IP traffic flow including every World Wide Web page view begins with at least one DNS transaction. DNS is, in a word, glorious.

To underline our understanding of what DNS is, we must differentiate it from what it is not. The Internet economy rewards unlimited creativity in the monetization of human action, and fairly often this takes the form of some kind of intermediation. For DNS, monetized intermediation means lying. The innovators who bring us such monetized intermediation do not call what they sell "lies," but in this case it walks like a duck and quacks like one, too.

by Paul Vixie

Maximizing Power Efficiency with Asymmetric Multicore Systems

Asymmetric multicore systems promise to use a lot less energy than conventional symmetric processors. How can we develop software that makes the most out of this potential?

Maximizing Power Efficiency with Asymmetric Multicore Systems

Asymmetric multicore systems promise to use a lot less energy than conventional symmetric processors. How can we develop software that makes the most out of this potential?

Alexandra Fedorova, Simon Fraser University; Juan Carlos Saez, Complutense University of Madrid; Daniel Shelepov, Microsoft; Manuel Prieto, Complutense University of Madrid

In computing systems, a CPU is usually one of the largest consumers of energy. For this reason, reducing CPU power consumption has been a hot topic in the past few years in both the academic community and the industry. In the quest to create more power-efficient CPUs, several researchers have proposed an asymmetric multicore architecture that promises to save a significant amount of power while delivering similar performance to conventional symmetric multicore processors.

An AMP (asymmetric multicore processor) consists of cores that use the same ISA (instruction set architecture) but deliver different performance and have different power characteristics. Using the same ISA on all cores means that you can run the same binary on all cores and not have to compile your code with a different compiler for each core type. This stands in contrast to heterogeneous-ISA systems, such as IBM's Cell or Intel's Larrabee, where the cores expose different ISAs, so the code must be compiled separately for each core type. Heterogeneous-ISA systems are not the focus of this article.

by Alexandra Fedorova, Juan Carlos Saez, Daniel Shelepov, Manuel Prieto