Rules for Mobile Performance Optimization

An overview of techniques to speed page loading

TAMMY EVERTS, RADWARE

Performance has always been crucial to the success of Web sites. A growing body of research has proven that even small improvements in page-load times lead to more sales, more ad revenue, more stickiness, and more customer satisfaction for enterprises ranging from small e-commerce shops to megachains such as Walmart.

Rules for Mobile Performance Optimization

Related:

Making the Mobile Web Faster

Best Practices on the Move: Building Web Apps for Mobile Devices

Which practices should be modified or avoided altogether by developers for the mobile Web?

ALEX NICOLAOU

If it wasn’t your priority last year or the year before, it’s sure to be your priority now: bring your Web site or service to mobile devices in 2013 or suffer the consequences. Early adopters have been talking about mobile taking over since 1999—anticipating the trend by only a decade or so. Today, mobile Web traffic is dramatically on the rise, and creating a slick mobile experience is at the top of everyone’s mind. Total mobile data traffic is expected to exceed 10 exabytes per month by 2017, as shown in figure 1 (in case your mind isn’t used to working in exabytes yet, that’s 10 million terabytes per month, or almost four terabytes per second).

Best Practices on the Move: Building Web Apps for Mobile Devices

Related:

Mobile Media: Making It a Reality

Streams and Standards: Delivering Mobile Video

Mobile Devices in the Enterprise: CTO Roundtable Overview

 

The Evolution of Web Development for Mobile Devices

Building Web sites that perform well on mobile devices remains a challenge.

NICHOLAS C. ZAKAS

The biggest change in Web development over the past few years has been the remarkable rise of mobile computing. Mobile phones used to be extremely limited devices that were best used for making phone calls and sending short text messages. Today’s mobile phones are more powerful than the computers that took Apollo 11 to the moon, with the ability to send data to and from nearly anywhere. Combine that with 3G and 4G networks for data transfer, and now using the Internet while on the go is faster than my first Internet connection, which featured AOL and a 14.4-kbps dialup modem.

The Evolution of Web Development for Mobile Devices

 

Related:

Making the Mobile Web Faster

Mobile Media: Making It a Reality

Mobile Devices in the Enterprise: CTO Roundtable Overview

 

Making the Mobile Web Faster

Mobile performance issues? Fix the back end, not just the client.

KATE MATSUDAIRA

Mobile clients have been on the rise and will only continue to grow. This means that if you are serving clients over the Internet, you cannot ignore the customer experience on a mobile device.

There are many informative articles on mobile performance, and just as many on general API design, but you’ll find few discussing the design considerations needed to optimize the back-end systems for mobile clients. Whether you have an app, mobile Web site, or both, it is likely that these clients are consuming APIs from your back-end systems.

Certainly, optimizing the on-mobile performance of the application is critical, but software engineers can do a lot to ensure that mobile clients are remotely served both data and application resources reliably and efficiently.

Making the Mobile Web Faster

 

Related:

Usablity Testing for the Web

Mobile Application Development: Web vs. Native

Streams and Standards: Delivering Mobile Video

A Decade of OS Access-control Extensibility

Open source security foundations for mobile and embedded devices

ROBERT N. M. WATSON, UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE COMPUTER LABORATORY

To discuss operating system security is to marvel at the diversity of deployed access-control models: Unix and Windows NT multiuser security; Type Enforcement in SELinux; anti-malware products; app sandboxing in Apple OS X, Apple iOS, and Google Android; and application-facing systems such as Capsicum in FreeBSD. This diversity is the result of a stunning transition from the narrow 1990s Unix and NT status quo to security localization—the adaptation of operating-system security models to site-local or product-specific requirements.

A Decade of OS Access-control Extensibility

Related:

Building Systems to Be Shared, Securely

ACM CTO Roundtable on Mobile Devices in the Enterprise

Extensible Programming for the 21st Century

Your Mouse is a Database

Web and mobile applications are increasingly composed of asynchronous and realtime streaming services and push notifications.

ERIK MEIJER

Among the hottest buzzwords in the IT industry these days is “big data,” but the “big” is something of a misnomer: big data is not just about volume, but also about velocity and variety:

http://queue.acm.org/detail.cfm?id=2169076