Hazy: Making it Easier to Build and Maintain Big-data Analytics

Racing to unleash the full potential of big data with the latest statistical and machine-learning techniques.

ARUN KUMAR, FENG NIU, AND CHRISTOPHER RÉ, DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCES, UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-MADISON

The rise of big data presents both big opportunities and big challenges in domains ranging from enterprises to sciences. The opportunities include better-informed business decisions, more efficient supply-chain management and resource allocation, more effective targeting of products and advertisements, better ways to “organize the world’s information,” faster turnaround of scientific discoveries, etc.

Hazy: Making it Easier to Build and Maintain Big-data Analytics

 

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Condos and Clouds

How Will Astronomy Archives Survive the Data Tsunami?

 

A Decade of OS Access-control Extensibility

Open source security foundations for mobile and embedded devices

ROBERT N. M. WATSON, UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE COMPUTER LABORATORY

To discuss operating system security is to marvel at the diversity of deployed access-control models: Unix and Windows NT multiuser security; Type Enforcement in SELinux; anti-malware products; app sandboxing in Apple OS X, Apple iOS, and Google Android; and application-facing systems such as Capsicum in FreeBSD. This diversity is the result of a stunning transition from the narrow 1990s Unix and NT status quo to security localization—the adaptation of operating-system security models to site-local or product-specific requirements.

A Decade of OS Access-control Extensibility

Related:

Building Systems to Be Shared, Securely

ACM CTO Roundtable on Mobile Devices in the Enterprise

Extensible Programming for the 21st Century

Divided by Division

Is there a “best used by” date for software?

Dear KV,

Do you know of any rule of thumb for how often a piece of software should need maintenance? I’m not thinking about bug fixes, since bugs are there from the moment the code is written, but about the constant refactoring that seems to go on in code. Sometimes I feel as if programmers use refactoring as a way of keeping their jobs, rather than offering any real improvement. Is there a “best used by” date for software?

Fresh Code

 

Dear KV,

I’ve been upgrading some Python 2 code to Python 3 and ran across the following change in the language. It used to be that division (/) of two integers resulted in an integer, but to get that functionality in Python 3, I need to use //. There is still a /, but that’s different. Why would anyone in their right mind have two similar operations that are that closely coded? Don’t they know this will lead to errors?

Divided by Division

 

Divided by Division

http://queue.acm.org/detail.cfm?id=2428618

Rethinking Passwords

Our authentication system is lacking. Is improvement possible?

WILLIAM CHESWICK

There is an authentication plague upon the land. We have to claim and assert our identity repeatedly to a host of authentication trolls, each jealously guarding an Internet service of some sort. Each troll has specific rules for passwords, and the rules vary widely and incomprehensibly.

Password length requirements vary: Dartmouth wants exactly eight characters; my broker, six to eight; Wells Fargo, eight or more. Special characters are often encouraged or required, but some characters are too special: many disallow spaces, single or double quotes, underlines, or hyphens. Some systems disallow certain characters at the beginning of the password; dictionary checks abound, including foreign language dictionaries.

Rethinking Passwords

 

Related:

Security – Problem Solved?

Building Secure Web Applications

LinkedIn Password Leak: Salt Their Hide