20 Obstacles to Scalability

Watch out for these pitfalls that can prevent Web application scaling.

SEAN HULL, HEAVYWEIGHT INTERNET GROUP

Web applications can grow in fits and starts. Customer numbers can increase rapidly, and application usage patterns can vary seasonally. This unpredictability necessitates an application that is scalable. What is the best way of achieving scalability?

20 Obstacles to Scalability

 

Related:
Improving Performance on the Internet
Building Scalable Web Services
Scalable SQL

Nonblocking Algorithms and Scalable Multicore Programming

Exploring some alternatives to lock-based synchronization

SAMY AL BAHRA, APPNEXUS

Real-world systems with complicated quality-of-service guarantees may require a delicate balance between throughput and latency to meet operating requirements in a cost-efficient manner. The increasing availability and decreasing cost of commodity multicore and many-core systems make concurrency and parallelism increasingly necessary for meeting demanding performance requirements. Unfortunately, the design and implementation of correct, efficient, and scalable concurrent software is often a daunting task.

Nonblocking Algorithms and Scalable Multicore Programming

 

Related:

Unlocking Concurrency

Software and the Concurrency Revolution

Real-World Concurrency

 

The Story of the Teapot in DHTML

Brian Beckman, Erik Meijer
It’s easy to do amazing things, such as rendering the classic teapot in HTML and CSS.

Before there was SVG (Scalable Vector Graphics), WebGL (Web Graphics Library), Canvas, or much of anything for graphics in the browser, it was possible to do quite a lot more than was initially obvious. To demonstrate, we created a JavaScript program that renders polygonal 3D graphics using nothing more than HTML and CSS. Our proof-of-concept is fast enough to support physics-based small-game content, but we started with the iconic 3D “Utah teapot” because it tells the whole story in one picture. It’s feasible to render this classic object using just regular DIV elements, CSS styles, and a little bit of JavaScript code. This tiny graphics pipeline serves as a timeless demonstration of doing a lot with very little.

The Story of the Teapot in DHTML

Related:

A Conversation with Ray Ozzie

Mobile Application Development: Web vs. Native

Scripting Web Services Prototypes